New Man Cover

Artist:Bruce Minney
Date:1970
Medium:Casein on illustration board
Dimensions:Sight size 14" by 16" on board that measures 18 1/4" by 19 3/4" Framed to 27 1/2" by 29 1/2"
Condition:Excellent
Original Use:Cover for New Man Magazine - June 1970
Price:Sold
Detail

Detail

The artwork as it appeared as the cover for New Man - June, 1970 (included in sale)

The artwork as it appeared as the cover for New Man - June, 1970 (included in sale)

Handsomely matted and framed behind glass.

Handsomely matted and framed behind glass.

With a human sacrifice as the central conflict, a high octane tribal fight scene, and lurid bondage damsel in distress subject matter, this Bruce Minney artwork--which appeared as the cover for the June 1970 edition of New Man Magazine--captures all of the subversive allure of the Men's magazine genre. Loosely illustrating the interior story, "Smash the Latins' Jungle Combine of Sin And Slavery," this has all of the compulsory head turning components required to command attention at America's crowded newsstands. Bruce Minney was recently featured on an episode of the TV series American Pickers, where Mike & Frank bought 6 of the artist's paintings and gave Minney some well-earned exposure. Sadly, the artist died the very day before the episode featuring his story was aired. Below are a couple of screen shots of the episode that show the pickers considering this cover painting and another illustration by Minney.

As seen on "The American Pickers".

As seen on "American Pickers".

As purchased by The American Pickers

A Nazi-themed original, later purchased in the episode.

In the 1960s and 1970s, men's magazines expanded on the lurid pulp magazine template of the 1930s, developing a Cold War-era narrative that showed the American male as a Superman, in a time filled with fast moving changes in social norms, and a certain anxiety within the mainstream culture of working class men.  "The Sweats" as they were commonly known, provided escape with their fast moving tales of heroes vanquishing exotic enemies like savages, Nazis, and Communist torturers.
Leading illustrators in this strangely subversive genre, such as Norman Saunders, James Bama, Bruce Minney, Rafael DeSoto and Mort Kunstler, created sensational, figurative illustrations executed in a style markedly similar to Socialist Realism and its associated propaganda imagery.

Full view before framing

Full view before framing

margin notations as seen before framing

margin notations as seen before framing

Detail

Detail

Verso view before framing

Verso view before framing

Frame profile and corner detail view

Frame profile and corner detail view



 

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